Writing and Reading Odds and Ends

1. Le Short Story.

From my buddy Roy, here's a nice essay on the short story.  Best quote from it:

"That grain of sand is the story’s salvation. I take my cue from William
Blake: “To see a world in a grain of sand.” Think of it: the world in a
grain of sand; which is to say, every part of the world, however small,
contains the world entirely. Or to put it another way: if you
concentrate your attention on some apparently insignificant portion of
the world, you will find, deep within it, nothing less than the world
itself."

The essay is by Steven Milhauser.

2.  Le Frenchman180px-Nobel2008Literature_news_conference1-1

In case you hadn't heard, a Frenchman won the Nobel Prize for Literature. 
His name is Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio and I'm embarrassed to admit I'd never heard of him until he won.  I'm intrigued by him, though, especially given that he divides his time between Albuquerque and France.   Check out the list of all the Nobel Prize winners at their website.  Its kind of a cool site.  Who knew?  (The photo at the right is of the announcement.)

3.  Le Weekend

I don't have a three.  It's Friday afternoon and I've been trying to get to my novel all day and so instead of casting about for some fascinating tidbit to balance out this post, I'm simply going to wish you a happy weekend and go write for a bit.


Photo from Wikipedia,
  published under the following Creative Commons license:
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2 Comments on "Writing and Reading Odds and Ends"

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Brian Barker
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10/11/2008 21:33

The fact that a French-man won the Nobel Prize for Literature will certainly annoy the anglophiles. After all, everyone now accepts that English is the international language.

I apologise for the satire, but speak as a native English speaker. Then, if English is unacceptable, on grounds of linguistic imperialism, what about Esperanto?

Yes Esperanto was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for Literature, in the name of Icelandic poet Baldur Ragnarrson.

This is true. Esperanto does have its own original literature. Please check http://www.esperanto.net to confirm.

Charlotte
Guest
10/11/2008 23:11

I don’t have a problem with Esperanto and I don’t have a problem with a Frenchman winning the Nobel Prize for Literature. Nor do I have a problem with an Englishman or an American (despite what the head of the jury said last week) or an African or a South American. Or anyone from any country, including Iceland. Thanks for commenting.

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