Tag Archives | agent

Get Rid of Your Fear of Rejection Once and For All

Broken_cracked_glass_265858_lRejection.  It is a fact of the writer’s life.

I wish I could tell you that this was not so.  I wish I could tell you that everything you send off would get picked up immediately.  But I can’t.  It is just not the way the world works.  And so, alas, if you are a writer you will need to get used to rejection.

For some writers, the thought of rejection is so paralyzing that they simply won’t send work out to begin with.  This fear or rejection is, um, counter-productive to say the least.  Because you know the old saying: nothing ventured, nothing gained.

To help you with this fear, I could tell you all the rejection—>triumph stories.  You’ve heard the one about John Grisham, who sent his first book out __ (the number varies according to the telling) before someone saw the brilliance of it.  And we know what happened to him: gazillions of dollars later, he’s a happy man (or at least I damned well hope he is).

I’ve also often told the story of one of my MFA mentors who sent one short story out 34 times.  It got rejected 34 times.  On the 35th time, she got it accepted–and that story went on to win a Pushcart prize.

Or there’s my own story, about my first novel, Emma Jean’s Bad Behavior.  I sent queries to 60 agents.  Yep, 60.  Its worth noting that I was getting encouraging rejections (we love this novel, but…).  The 61st time I sent it to a publisher.  And they picked it up.

So, rah rah rah and all that.  I do know from personal experience that stories such as these can lift me up in the moment until its time to actually send stuff out again.  And then … the voice of doom in my head begins.

But here’s help.  Because I’ve recently realized we deal with our fear of rejection from the wrong end of the equation.   We deal with it when it happens, when the it has the power to lay us out flat on the couch sobbing for days.  A huge part of the reason we get so discouraged over rejection is because we have such high hopes for our work.  We are convinced that we will send the story out once, and sure enough, it will get picked up.  We’ll contact an agent and she’ll snap us before the book is even written.   We send off the query, and every time we think about the results of it–publication, fame, accolades–we get a warm, glowy feeling inside.

Okay, so I’m here to tell you: the easiest way to deal with rejection is to get rid of your expectations in the first place.  Instead of thinking about publication and how glorious it will be, let your work be the reward.  When you know its time to send your piece out–and you will know if you’re honest with yourself–do your research and ship it out the door.  And then quit thinking about it and move on.

Cultivate an attitude of non-expectation.  Be Buddhist. Be Zen. Do not be attached to the outcome, period.  And get to work on your next project.

Let your work be your reward.

Then, when the rejection comes, it is far, far easier to shrug your shoulders and say to yourself, I guess it just wasn’t right for them, and move on.  And by moving on I mean, send it out again.  Because you haven’t put the weight of the world on your poor little query, it will be much happier to go out into the world and try once more.

Right?  So go send something out.  Right now.  I’m serious.  Do it.  And report back when you’re done.

Photograph by Jfg.

8

Never Underestimate the Power of a Writing Prompt

Promptbox

The prompt box

I've been writing again–this morning, 2,000 words in an hour, words that came easily and almost effortlessly.  This, after noodling around, trying to decide which novel idea to pick up next.  (I've got four of them churning around in my brain.)  

I'm also a tad bit distracted, because my agent is sending my current novel,The Bonne Chance Bakery out to publishers this week.  No big deal. Not. (I don't expect to hear anything for quite awhile, because one thing I'm learning about this process is that everything takes longer than I think it will.  Sort of like home remodeling.  But I will keep you posted, I promise.)

Anyway, it feels so good to be writing again.  So freaking good.  And for it also to feel like I'm working on a project that is flowing, if you know what I mean.  I've made starts on the other novels and while I have made some progress they didn't quite have the feel of this one–the feeling that the story is right there at my fingertips, that my hands can't range across the keyboard fast enough. I get an idea for something else in the chapter and pause only to make a quick note because I'm going so fast I'll lose the thread otherwise.

That kind of writing.

And guess what? It all came from prompts.  I've written three chapters so far and when I looked back on them this morning I realized they had all started with a prompt.  I'm sort of like the Prompt Queen, because I push them on others so much (including publishing a weekly collection of them here), but sometimes I forget to use them myself.  (The shoemaker's children have no shoes.) But recently, in going through a cupboard in my office, I found a box of prompts I'd made long ago.  I rescued it and stationed it on my desk and I've been pulling prompts as starters for this novel.  Clearly, it's working.

Here are a couple thoughts on the process of using a prompt to make forward progress on a WIP: 

1.  Choose at random.  Close your eyes and metaphorically pull a prompt from whatever kind of prompt box you keep.  Or run your finger down a selection of prompts and use whatever one it lands on.  And then don't change your mind!  Just use it!  One of my best pieces–what will likely be the opening of the novel–came from a prompt I hated.  I almost put it back and chose another one, but decided to use it.

2.  Start fresh every day.  I've been easing myself back into writing the next novel.  If I think too hard about it, I freak myself out.  As in, this one has to be better than the last!  Now that I have an agent, everything I do has to be top notch! And so it kinda works better to pretend that I'm just goofing around.  I open a new file every day and I don't call it anything like a chapter.  I label it Daily Writing and then the date.  Then I write the prompt and go for it.

3.  Use prompts from previous writings.  (Can't call them chapters, remember.)  This morning I used the last line of the previous day's work.

4.  Let your brain wander where it will.  That's the beauty of prompts–yours may be about flowers in the garden and you end up writing about sailing on the sea.  That is a little less likely to happen when you're attempting to make forward progress on a long project, but your hands may still take you unexpected places.  Let them.  Those often turn out to be the jewels.  And God invented the delete key for those times when they don't.

5.  Do timed spurts.  I'm still a huge believer in this.  Set your phone timer for 30 minutes and when it goes off, get your ass up and take a stroll around your office.  Or do a couple lunges.  Or stretch.  It's important to get up.  When things are not going well, 30 minutes seems like an eternity and when I'm done, its, yay, now I can quit.  This morning, I promptly (ha!) thought, I'm going to do another one.  And then another.  2,000 words later I was a happy writer.

I think I'm going to add some prompts to my prompt box, maybe cutting up old manuscripts or cutting out lines from magazines.  I like having it sitting on my desk because then I, um, remember to use it.

So, I've probably asked you this before, but what the heck, I'll do it again: do you use prompts for your writing?

5

Gone Rewriting

I am working on a rewrite of my novel, The Bonne Chance Bakery.  And, of course, the exciting news is that this rewrite is not just for me.  Nope, I am rewriting to the notes from the agent with whom I just signed, Erin Niumata, and one of her readers.  

This is all happening fast.  As in, a month ago I hadn't even submitted a query on this novel.  And now I have an agent for it and am working on a rewrite.  This process is interesting, and to all my students and clients, current and former, I say, yes you really do need to expand those descriptions and details! That is one thing I'm seeing repeatedly–a request for more details and description of my characters.  It cracks me up, because I'm constantly saying this to clients–more, more, more!  

Anyway, I have a deadline coming right up to finish this rewrite (which is an excellent thing, as I am very deadline-oriented).  But with my current load of clients, my students at MTSU, and my clamoring family, that means time is at a premium the next couple of weeks.  I've already emailed people and postponed lunches and coffees and non-essential meetings.  

The next thing to fall is going to be blog posts.  You know I can't ignore you for long, and I won't.  I will post at least once a week, but until mid-March that will likely be it.  I know you will understand and forgive me.

In the meantime, there's over 1,000 posts on this site, so you can start at the beginning, nearly eight years ago and read up to the current day.  I'm kidding.  However, there is a topic cloud in the right sidebar and if you click on some of those subjects, you'll find reading material tailored to your interests.

And let me just remind you of three upcoming workshops:

In Portland, How to Write A Book, on March 21 (mercifully after my deadline).  I think we only have a couple of spots left, so let me know if you are interested!

In Nashville, May 1 and 2nd, From Spark to Story.

In Collioure, France, Secrets of Structure, September 5-12.  There is only one spot left here, so let me know if you want to come.  It is going to be a blast!

Oh, and rumor has it there may be an online workshop coming up one of these days soon, so stay tuned!  And happy writing!

16

When the Time is Right

I was talking to my friend Janet yesterday, and I told her my story about acquiring my agent. 

"Wow, when the time is right, things happen fast," she said. Antique_zodiac_past_234914_l

Yes, they do.

And, when the time is right, things happen a bit differently.  I do NOT recommend this, but I ignored lots of the advice I routinely dole out about seeking an agent.  I did not send multiple queries, for instance.  I chose the agent I wanted and sent one query to her, because I felt so certain that she would feel the same way.

Lucky thing I was right.

Also, this manuscript had not been seen by a lot of eyes.  A few people had seen the first chapters, but nobody but me had seen the full thing when I sent it out.  I DO NOT RECOMMEND THIS.  It is a really good idea to have your manuscript read by a critique group, or beta readers, or an editor or coach.  The only reason I didn't do that is because I had a strong feeling that Erin would connect with my manuscript and I felt a sense of urgency about getting it to her.

And it all worked out even more perfectly and wonderfully than I could have hoped.  

But, here's the deal–and this is a very important deal, I might add.  I've been working at this for years.  My overnight success has been eons in the making.  I've written novels that never saw the light of day, earned my MFA, published a novel (with a small press), blogged here for eight years. I've coached writers and taught them and critiqued manuscripts.  I've joined associations, and read articles and books and blog posts galore on writing. I've tweeted and Pinterested and Instagrammed and Facebooked.  I've immersed myself in the world of writing fully for the last dozen years, and partially before that.

I'm not saying all that to brag, but just to point out that there's been a ton of work behind this.  And while I hope that you don't have to wait quite as long as I did, I do want to emphasize that you will have to do some work to reach your dreams.

Yeah, I know you know that.  And I have people ask me all the time how to get an agent–when they've not yet written one word.  Or tell me that they are going to send their book proposal that consists of one page of ideas to a top publisher.  And then they will wonder why they got rejected. 

I hate being all lecture-y like this but it is one of my pet peeves.  Do the work first and concentrate on that.  Please. The rest will follow when the time is right.

Even if it does take twelve years.

Photo by brokenarts.

10

How I Got My Agent

FotoliaTimeForMiraclesFor starters, in case you missed the news, I am now officially represented by Erin Niumata at Folio Lit. Woot woot!  Best news ever.  It happened fast.  She was the only agent I sent the query to, and it was one week from sending her the query to the phone call offering representation.

A freaking miracle.

And that's what I want to write about today–the process I went through to make this miracle happen.

But first.  Let's contrast this magical occurrence in 2013 with my process in 2011 and 2012 when I was submitting Emma Jean's Bad Behavior.  I sent that novel to 60 agents.  Yes, 60.  I was determined–or maybe just deluded.  But I loved my cranky Emma Jean and I thought others would, too.  Some did–but more of them, at least in the publishing world, were overwhelmed and taken aback by her.  The constant refrain that I heard was, "we're afraid she's unrelatable."  (I actually think she was a character ahead of her time by a year or two.  Because after the book got picked up by a small press, the movie Bad Teacher and the TV show Bad Judge both came out.)

So I've now experienced both sides of the submitting process–immediate gratification and the long, painful sending out of emails, many of which never got a response, most of which got rejections, albeit encouraging ones.   (If you are in the middle of doing that, you have my sympathy.)  Because of both these experiences, I know the process well.  And I've come up with a few hints and tips. Here's how I did it :

1.  I finished the book.  If you are writing a novel or a memoir, you need to have the manuscript finished before you can start submitting. (Non-fiction books are a different beast, and are sold with proposals.)  Not only do you need to finish your book, you need to make it as good as you possibly can–this is likely going to mean more than a couple drafts.  I wrote two drafts of The Bonne Chance Bakery, as the next novel is tentatively called.

2. I let others read it.  Find either a critique group (which will often read your drafts in progress) or beta readers (who are readers you trust, not necessarily writers though they can be, who will read the whole thing at once) and get their reaction.  You can find critique groups or partners and beta readers through local writer's groups.  Okay–true confessions, I fell down on this step a bit.  Several writers had read the first few chapters, but that was all.  If I'd been following  my own advice I would have sent it out to beta readers before I submitted it.  And, I had some lined up.  But something told me to go ahead and send the query, so I did.

3. I wrote the best f*%@ing query ever.  I will admit, I'm a good query writer.  You should develop this skill, too, as it will open doors for you.  There's tons of advice online for writing queries, and if you have a specific agent in mind, her website may well tell you what she is looking for (mine did). Follow that advice to the letter.  If you can't find it, here's a basic template:

–Tell why you are submitting to that agent (see #4)

–Devote a 2-3 paragraphs to your story, with a great hook

–Wrap up with your bio

This should all fit onto one page in letter format if you were printing it out.

4.  I researched agents.  Please don't skip this step.  I learned about Erin through the Women's Fiction Writer's Association and Twitter, and then I haunted her agency page and Googled her.  I decided she was the perfect agent for me.  (Luckily, she agreed.)  But I knew that she repped a lot of women's fiction writers and further, that she was specifically looking for more.  And, I knew she had just opened up for submissions.  If I hadn't done my research, I wouldn't have known all of this.  If I had submitted during a period when she wasn't reading, my email would have been ignored.  If I had sent a query through the regular mail, it would have been thrown out–Folio only accepts email submissions.  YOU MUST FIND THIS STUFF OUT.  Find yourself a good agent listing site, choose some likely candidates, and then cross reference to their websites to be certain you have current info. And then follow the guidelines on the website!

5.  I got personal recommendations.  Not this time around, but last time I did.  And let me tell you, if you can write something like "Famous Author Recommended Me" in the subject line, your query is going to go to the top of the pile.  A variation on this theme is to attend conferences and meet with agents there.

6. I braced myself for rejection.  Okay, so it didn't happen.  What did happen is that Erin read my query (itself a minor miracle–she usually sends them right on to her readers) and immediately requested the full manuscript.  And then, um, in a week she was offering me representation.  But don't take this as the usual way things happen!  Like I said, I was ready for rejection (remember, I sent Emma jean out to over 60 agents).  When you do get rejected, scream and yell and sob for a couple minutes and then take a deep breath and hit reply and ask that agent if they can think of any other agents who might be interested. (This advice only works if you've gotten a positive rejection.  If its a form letter, don't try it.)  You might not hear from them–but then again you could.  And if you do, put their name in the subject line when you query (See #5.)

7. I've been basking….Let me tell you, after all the years I've been in this busy, to hear the words, "I am calling to offer you representation by Folio Literary," was one of the best moments of my life. I've told everybody–friends, family, strangers, grocery store checkers.  This is the greatest thing ever!

8.  What happens next?  I signed the agency contract, and last week Erin had an editorial meeting with the two other readers she had assigned the manuscript to.  She is at this very moment writing up an editorial letter.  When I receive that, its time for me to focus on rewriting.  And then Erin will begin submitting it to publishers.  Woot woot! I promise to keep you posted!

Any questions about the process?  Leave a comment and I'll do my best to answer them.

19

Do You Need to Recover Your Writing Equilibrium?

NEWS FLASH! Okay, when I started writing this I knew that good things were afoot–but now I can make the announcement: Erin Niumata of Folio Lit has agreed to represent me!  She will be repping my novel, The Bonne Chance Bakery, and future works as well.  I will write about the process (which has happened fast–like in a week) in a future post.  So now the following will make sense: Scale_gram_kilo_239552_l

I'm buzzing with excitement over new developments in my life, so much so that it is hard to come back down to earth.  But there are words to be written and work to be done.  What to do? How to move forward on the page after a big event has happened in your life?  Read on.

2015 has been a great year for me.  We're only one month in, and things are happening! And, I'm aware that not everyone is so fortunate.  I've had downer winters, believe me.  And if I had read about someone leaping about with happiness during one of those downer times, I probably would have wretched.  So forgive me if that is where you find yourself–my aim is to inspire, not depress.

But here's the thing–either great excitement or great discouragement often has the same result: you feel disconnected from your writing, unable to work.  And yeah, it feels way, way better when you're wandering around with your head in the clouds because good things are happening but it can be just as distracting.  (It is funny how often the good and the bad result in the same feeling inside. Excitement and nervousness, for instance–pretty much the same feeling in your stomach and chest. Remember that the next time you're really nervous about something.)

What you need to do is root yourself back in your life.  What do I mean by this?  Often when I'm reading a manuscript, I get the feeling that the characters are floating in the air.  They talk and move about but I have no idea where they are.  There's an easy fix for this–drop in a hint or two about the physical location to keep the reader grounded.  And so that's what I need to do–come down from the air where I'm floating and reconnect with my life!

Some suggestions (for me and you):

1.  Give into it.  I'm a great believer in celebrating–and wallowing.  Whether your news is good or bad, you likely don't feel like writing.  So, don't.  I know, shocking.  I never say that.  But in this case, trying to write while you are excited or devastated is fruitless.  You'll just stare at the computer screen.

2.  Get away from it.  This week, I've given up.  I'm not writing–instead, I'm working on cleaning my desk off and packing up my office to move it downstairs, a long-delayed project.  It is really, really hard for me to step away from the computer, but allowing myself time to do something else feels good.

3.  Do something for someone else.  At times like this we I tend to be totally focused on me, me, me.  After you have celebrated or wallowed, try focusing outward and see what happens.  Give a homeless person a Starbucks card, or offer to walk your neighbor's dog.  

4.  Indulge in some self care.  And now we get to the polar opposite of #3.  What can I say?  I like contradictions.  In truth, we think of self care as selfish, but it really isn't.  And if you are in a time of great or bad things happening, you're in a time of stress. I've been writing about self care this week, so I won't repeat myself here.  Besides, you know what you like.  (For me lately, its a massage.)

5.  Write your way back into it.  I know, I know.  The issue at hand is that you're too distracted to write. But you can, and maybe should, journal.  Pouring your heart out on the page can sometimes be the most helpful thing of all–and it just might lead you back to your beloved WIP.

Okay, that's all I've got.  What is your favorite way to come back to earth?  Leave a comment!

Image by Pontuse.

8

Book Review: Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors & Literary Agents

Cache_240_240_0_0_80_16777215_jh-guide-2015-frontSo, there's this thing called the internet.  And we use it for nearly all our research into anything these days.  This is especially true for research on topics that have to be current, such as, well, agent and editor listings.  When you have a story or novel to submit, you hit the interwebs to find a spot for it, right?

Believe it or not, back in the old days, writers had to rely on books for such research.  Like real, physical books.  And most of the time when you were doing research the books you needed to reference were huge and unwieldy tomes housed in the library.  There were also books published by Writer's Digest and others, extensive, expensive listings of publishing contacts that were out of date by the time you bought them.  Overall, it was a royal pain. So, thank God for the internet.  When I was submitting Emma Jean to a gazillion publishers I used internet agent listing sites extensively.  

(Alas, I'm having a hard time finding any current ones I can link to.  There used to be an amazing one that listed everyone, compiled by a guy with a serious case of sour grapes, who posted every single rejection letter he ever got, and the agent contact info, too.  It was a fantastic resource–but also bordered on libelous at times.  I suspect he got shut down.  Anybody remember this site or have a link for it? NEWS FLASH–I found it!  Here's the link to part one, of seven.  Check it out.  The guy is relentless.)

Anyway, I digress.  I hadn't paid much attention to agent listings lately (this will change soon, as I'm finishing the rewrite of my second novel–agents, I'm looking at you, yes, you, soon) and had assumed that the big guidebooks were a thing of the past.  But, oh how wrong I was.  Because towards the end of last year I was offered the chance to review Jeff Herman's Guide to Book Publishers, Editors & Literary Agents.   And, having my own agent search in mind as well as the needs of my loyal readers, I said yes.

I have to say, the book is pretty great.  The bulk of it is a directory of publishers, literary agents and independent editors.  Since I'm most interested in agents at this point, that's what I focused on perusing.  And what I like about the listings is that besides the basic info about email and address, they also include a Q and A interview the agent has filled out, which really gives you more insight into them.  

And that's not all–there are numerous essays throughout the book.  These are written mainly by Herman and his wife Deborah.  Some, like the one on digital marketing, are useless.  But others, like the chapter on how agents work and how to find one are quite good.  (I'll be talking more about that chapter in a future post, because as I was writing this up it occurred to me that a How to Find an Agent post would be an excellent idea.)

There's also info on writing book proposals and query letters, definitions of publishing terms, insider tips, and so on.  It's quite the comprehensive book.  And it's got a price tag to match–$29.99 (a bit less on Amazon).   

So, the question is whether or not I would recommend this book.  And the answer is….yes, if.  What I mean by that is yes, if you are a newbie to the writing and publishing world.  (Though do bear in mind that Herman approaches these worlds with a very particular mindset.)  There's a ton of information here that will give you a good grounding in the industry.  If you have more experience in these worlds, check it out from the library.  Because it is fun to leaf through and read and of course, the directory part seems to be quite extensive.  (But also remember that the publishing industry is notoriously fluid.  You'd do well to double check any information in the book with a look at the internet.)

Do you have an agent?  Did you use a directory to find one?

(For the record, I received a copy of the book in order to write this post, but no other compensation.) 

5

Creation and Implementation: Two Distinct Stages of the Process

Sometimes you gotta spend most of your time writing, and some times you gotta spend most of your time doing all the stuff that surrounds it.  This is something all creatives (do we like calling us that? I can't decide) struggle with at times.  And I believe if you can master the art of separating the two, you'll have a lot more success.   Desi-question-mark-817928-l

Or at least be happier.

I'm talking about the acts of creation and implementation.  

They are two distinct stages of the creative process, and need to be treated as such.  And yet, we–myself included–tend to muck them up and mix them up and try to do them at the same time and that just doesn't work.

Creation.  I think of creation as anything related to the actual act of putting words on the page, like:

  • Writing
  • Writing exercises
  • Editing
  • Journaling
  • Brainstorming

Implementation is anything related to the act of getting your work out in the world, such as:

  • Researching publication
  • Querying agents or editors
  • Proof-reading
  • Formatting a manuscript for publication
  • Promotion and author platform

You may not even realize you are mixing up the two.  You might find yourself spending long hours on researching potential agents before your novel is completed, for instance, or learning everything there is to know about self-publishing before you've written a single word.  Or you might find yourself adding words to a short story even after you've decreed it finished and are in the process of sending it out.

The thing is, you need to make time for each aspect. At different stages, one will take precedence over the other.  When you've polished your novel, for instance, and are ready for it to take the world by storm, you'll either begin that agent search or start the self-publishing process, and you'll likely spend more time doing this than actual writing.  Or when first you begin a blog, you'll spend a lot of time setting it up and not quite so much writing blog posts.

Ultimately, however, if you're not spending most of your time in creation, then you're not going to have anything worth implementing.  I know this is obvious, but in our crazy social media, information-obsessed world, its easy to convince yourself that its more important to write a Facebook post than get a few more hundred words ranked up on the novel.

So here's my simple rule:

Creation, first, implementation second.

If you live by it, you'll be a happy creative.

Discussion?  How do you get sidelined in the creation versus implementation teeter-totter? 

 

18

Getting an Agent

I've promised to be forthcoming about every aspect of the process of getting my book published, so here goes another post on it. 

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Last week I off-handedly mentioned that I was looking for an agent.  Later, was speaking with my buddy Square-Peg Karen (keep an eye out for a cool collaboration we're working on) and she asked me for clarification about the publishing process. 

"Don't you usually get an agent before you get a publisher?" she asked.

Yes, indeed that is true.  At least when you are dealing with the big New York publishing houses.  Most of those folks won't even talk to you unless you have an agent.  Think of agents as the gate-keepers in an industry that is overwhelmed with authors trying to claw their way through the doors.

Twenty years or so ago, the big New York houses had their super-star authors, and then those on the mid-list, and then the ones they'd take a chance on, the books that might sell only a few copies but whose authors might eventually rise to the top.  Not so much anymore.  Due to the vagaries of the publishing world, the big houses really want a sure thing.

Like there are any sure things.

Enter the small publishing houses.  Once the big boys stopped taking so many risks, they opened the doors for small publishing houses to spring up and assume that role.  Then, with the advent of digital and Print on Demand publishing, it became even easier to start a small press.  And so the small presses of the world fill an important part of the overall publishing world.

And they don't require agents to submit.

The press (I'm getting close to being able to reveal the name) that is publishing my book doesn't offer an advance, but instead a much higher royalty.  The big boys offer an advance but small royalties.  I kinda like this arrangement because it means my earnings are proportionate to my efforts.  Sometimes with the big boys, your book gets lost and then you're stymied.  I've seen this happen to a couple of my good friends.

But back to my agent search.  Last week I corresponded with a lovely agent whose name I'm protecting because I'm not sure he wants to be inundated with submissions.  I had written him to inquire if I needed representation.  He asked me some questions and then got back to me, explaining that I'd already done the hard part, gotten the book accepted.  He further explained that it probably wasn't going to be worth my while or the agent's while to have him negotiate a contract.  And here's a nugget: most agencies have a minimum commission of $2500, which would be on an advance of $18,000.

So I'm abandoning my search for an agent for now.  The plan is to get good sales with this book and then leverage them to get an agent for my next novel.  Unless I decide I like the independent publishing route best, which is a distinct possibility.

I'm in contact with my editor, and once I get a signed contract, I'll be naming names.  Yay!

Do you have experiences, good or bad, with agents?  The publishing world?  Please comment.

Create a successful, inspired writing life: Think about what kind of publishing experience you want.  Do you want to have the control?  Or do you want to give it up to someone else?  We're lucky to live in a time when both options are possible.

Photo by brokenarts.  Plus, Typepad's photo editor is wonky which is why the image has so much room of its own.  And by the way, its an image of a gate.  You know, gate=gatekeeper=agent.  You probably got all that without me explaining it.

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