Tag Archives | book

Author Interview: Kayla Dawn Thomas

I'm happy to share an interview with my friend, Kayla Dawn Thomas, today.  Actually, Kayla and I have only met through social media (primarily Twitter and Instagram), but that is about to change. Because this summer, she and her family are visiting Portland.  And on July 23rd, the two of us will be doing a reading at a cool local bookstore, Another Read Through on Mississippi, one of Portland's happening neighborhoods.  I love this bookstore, and I love that the owner, Elisa Saphier, is a huge supporter of local authors.  So come on out and join us on the 23rd at 7 PM.  And even if you can't come that night, please do drop into the store if you live in town or are visiting. And now, without further ado, let's find out more about Kayla Dawn. KaylaDawn

Tell us a little about yourself. I’m a family, book, wine lovin’ lady. My husband, daughter, and I are living a mostly peaceful, quiet life in Eastern Washington (Go Cougs!) 

How and why did you get started writing novels? 

It was something I wanted to do since about second or third grade. That’s when the reading bug really bit me, and I wanted to make cool books like the ones I was tearing through. I wrote stories in one form or another all the way through high school. Some harsh college professors slashed my writing confidence, so there was about a decade where I didn’t write anything. Then one day in my early thirties, I started journaling. I was battling anxiety and depression. The idea was to work through that, but what ended up happening was a novel! My childhood dream came true in the midst of that darkness. It’s amazing how life works.

Please tell us a little bit about each of your titles.

Swept Up is my first novel. It was the result of scribbling in that journal. The process of writing broken characters and working them through healing, and of course, falling in love was very cathartic.

TS Cover finalThe Jenna Ray Stories have been a hoot to write. It all started when a Twitter friend posted a picture of a note he found in a library book that read: Have a stranger come to the bar-tell her he loves her-asks her to go to Chicago with him the next weekend-she doesn’t go. I let my imagination run wild and created a woman vigilante who’s life’s mission is to put an end to wandering penis syndrome (AKA cheating husbands). After writing Narrow Miss on a whim, my husband encouraged me to make it a series. Currently I’m working on the fourth installment. At the moment, I believe there will be five total.

 Tackling Summer is my newest novel. It’s very near and dear to my heart as it takes place on a cattle ranch very similar to the one I grew up on. It was fun to revisit childhood memories and the beautiful mountains that left their indelible mark on me. There are so many adventures one can have out in the sticks. I have a feeling there will be more books in this type of setting. 

 Why did you decide to go the indie publishing route?  Do you plan to continue in this arena? 

Ahhh, the million dollar question. First off, I’ve always wanted to work for myself. After doing LOTS of homework and realizing I could turn my passion for writing into a viable business, there was no question of the direction I would take. The idea of skipping over the gatekeepers and doing things my way was beyond exciting. At this time, I plan to continue with indie publishing.

 Who inspires you?  In the same vein, who do you like to read? 

 It’s tough to narrow down who inspires me the most! First off, my mom and sister. They are both successful entrepreneurs in different fields, and it’s been very inspiring to watch them grow their businesses. Toby Neal and Shanna Hatfield are the two female indie authors I want to be when I grow up. They’re producing great work, run impressive businesses, and are downright good people. They always make time to answer my newbie questions and have been so encouraging to me.

I read a little bit of everything except horror. I hate being scared and/or grossed out. I like happy endings. I turn to Shanna Hatfield when I want something light and friendly. Janet Evanovich is my got to when I want to laugh. Toby Neal and J.D. Robb/Nora Roberts oftentimes take care of my need for a mystery/romance combo fix. I guess there’s a common thread running through that list. I like a good love story, and they can take many forms.

 Writing plans for the future? 

I’m working on the fourth novella in the Jenna Ray Stories. I’m hoping to have that out in early fall. I’m also sketching an outline for a novel based around Webb Baker’s sister, Celeste, from Swept Up. I knew the moment I typed “the end” on that manuscript that Celeste had a story to tell.

Where can we connect with you? You can find me over at my website www.kayladawnthomas.com. My monthly newsletter is the best way to keep up with my new releases, sales, events, special giveaways. I also spend a fair bit of time on Facebook

Kayla Dawn Thomas writes general and women’s fiction, as well as chick lit novels and novellas. Her mission is to give her readers an escape, from a chronically busy, overwhelmed world offering them the opportunity to settle in and discover someplace new, maybe crack a smile, and find a little romance. She’s been a storyteller all her life. Before she knew how to write, she told stories to a jump rope. Thankfully that stage ended once she learned how to work a pencil. Now she’s blessed to be able to write full time and looks forward to sharing her crazy ideas with readers. Always a romantic, Kayla managed to marry her high school sweetheart. They have a very bright, active nine-year-old daughter.

When not writing or being mom, Kayla can most likely be found in a cozy spot with a good book. Reading, sunshine, and hanging out with family and friends bring her joy.

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Interview About Emma Jean

Curves_yellow_reflection_2929_hGood Morning.

How does that cup of coffee you've got clutched in your hand taste?  Wouldn't it be even zestier if you had some scintillating reading material to accompany it?

Yes?

I have just the thing for you.

I've got an interview up today over at Jessica Nottingham's blog, Hopelessly Devoted Bibliophile, in which I invent a movie tagline for Emma Jean, talk about my favorite part of being an author, name the one book I always reread, and more!

Check it out here, and be sure to say hi in the comments while you are there.  Then stick around to read more of Jessica's posts, she's got all kinds of good stuff on books and authors.

Photo by Adrian Sampson.

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Trust the Reader

I was on the phone with one of my writing coaching clients (who just so happens to be a kick-ass SciFi adventure writer).

"I'm enjoying your book," he said.

I thanked him.

"I think my wife is enjoying it even more.  She keeps stealing it from me."

I allowed as how this didn't surprise me, seeing as how the novel is most definitely women's fiction and my client's book is more of a rough-and-tumble type romp.

"She told me last night that she thinks she's just gotten to a place in the book where she is less irritated with Emma Jean and is beginning to see her change."

I loved hearing this, because it means that my client's wife got Emma Jean.  Yes, Emma Jean is self-absorbed to the point of cluelessness at the start (I believe one reviewer said she "wanted to take her by the shoulders and shake her") but there's also a deep woundedness inside her that makes her act this way.

I've always trusted my readers to get that. To get irritated with her, and want to shake some sense into her but still be willing to go on her journey with her–because they understand that she will transform at the end.

I'm not going to give away the ending by saying how she transforms, but suffice it to say she does transform.  That's what I love about women's fiction–its characters go on journeys of transformation.

The funny thing is, I had numerous agents tell me that Emma Jean was too "unrelatable."  And yet, over and over again, I get comments from people who tell me how much they love her, how they empathize with her, how they know someone just like her.

I'm glad I trusted the reader.

In what ways have you learned to trust the reader?

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7 Tips for a Fabulous Book Reading

School-person-literature-15648-lI did my first in-person reading of Emma Jean's Bad Behavior last night (I did one on the telephone, which was a bit trippy, for the virtual release party).  It was at at local coffee shop and I'm happy to report that it went really well.   People laughed in all the right places and after the initial rush you get when you stand up in front of a group, I relaxed and settled into it.

I've done a lot of public speaking, presenting workshops on various aspects of writing, and yet reading my own work is a bit of a different beast.  While I've read pieces in manuscript form through the years, now I'm getting used to reading from an actual book.  I thought you might like a few tips.  (I'm probably writing these nearly as much for myself, as a reminder, as for you.)  Because once you are published, and maybe even before, you will get asked to read.

1.  Plan your reading.  Figure out what you are going to read.  I've gone to lovely readings where the author read in an organized flow, segueing from a piece of chapter one, to chapter three and further in, which can give a good idea of a book.  When I tried to do this, it was a disaster–I got confused, and I wrote the book.  So I settled with several passages with chapter one and that worked great.  If you are reading in chunks, be sure to provide connecting information to your audience–and plan it out ahead of time.

2.  Plan your attire.  This sounds vain, but it isn't, really, because you are going to have a roomful of eyes on you and you don't want to be fussing with pulling your shirt down while they watch.  Last night I chose one of those cardigans with long tails in the front precisely so that I didn't have to worry if my stomach was hanging out.  (I thought if I wore my Spanx I wouldn't be able to breathe.  See #5.)

3.  Suss out the location.  Check it out ahead of time.  The coffee shop where I read has a regular Thursday evening reading series and I'd been there a couple times to hear friends read.  I knew there was no podium and that I'd be speaking into a standing microphone.  And I knew this meant that I was going to have do practice reading with my book held in front of my face.   See next tip.

4.  Practice, practice, practice.  This is far and away my most important advice.  Practicing will give you confidence, the confidence that comes from familiarity with your material. It will alert you to potential minefields–the word you've never been sure exactly how to pronounce, the swear word that might not be appropriate for your audience, the sex scene you might want to save for another venue.  Your work sounds different when you read it aloud–do it ahead of time to find potential problems.

5.  Breathe.  Once you've walked onstage, try to remember to take a deep breath.  As mentioned early, there is a rush of energy that comes in the act of getting yourself up in front of others and it can make it hard to catch your breath.  Nerves make you breathe faster, too.  This didn't happen to me last night, but it has in the past, and then I struggled to overcome my shallow breathing.

6.  Make eye contact.  Look up at your audience once in awhile, instead of keeping your nose buried in the book or manuscript.  This was something I could have done better last night, but since I was reading from my book with no podium, I had to wear reading glasses and it was awkward to peer over them.

7.  Enjoy.  You might not be able to actually utilize this tip until you've done a few readings and gotten used to them.  But you will feel the rush of relief when you are done, and people are applauding.  Soak it in!

 Your turn.  Do you have any tips for readings?  Do you enjoy them, or dread them?

(And by the way, if you feel so moved to buy a copy of Emma Jean you can find info on online outlets here.)

 Photo by svilen001.

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Oh, Amazon, You Trickster, You

Book-books-collection-415-lIf you enter the title of my novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior, into the Amazon search engine, up my book will pop, despite the fact that its pub date is not until February 12th.  And no, there's nothing about pre-ordering it mentioned on the page.  It's just there.  For sale.

I found this out thanks to the alert eyes of my reader and online buddy Zan Marie.  Now, I'd be happy to have my book available for sale, except for a couple of things:

–This isn't the final copy.  I worked on final proofing all the way to Nashville and back.  Caught a few small errors.  No big deal, you say?  Uh-uh.  Not for me.  I'm a printer's daughter and pride myself on being able to catch typos.  (Now, of course, you'll find one or more.  That's alright.  I can take it.  Let me know, I won't be hurt.) I also tinkered with the acknowledgments (the hardest part of writing the book, I swear) a bit.  And I wanted my readers to get this corrected copy, the final, final copy.  The perfect one.

–We set the pub date for February 12th and I wanted to have the requisite hoopla around it on that date.  Not some vague earlier time.  I wanted it to be a specific date, an event.  (I'm working on ideas for how I can share this event with you, so stay tuned.)  Silly, maybe, but so be it.

So I emailed my ever-patient editor and she promptly contacted Amazon to have them take it down, at the very least until the final final copy gets to them.  (You'll still see it listed for sale if you search for it or click here.  I actually don't know what happens if you click on it to buy it.)

But here's what cracks me up: Just as Emma Jean does in the novel, I started checking my Amazon sales rank.  At one point, it was down to #717,876 or something like that.  Wow!  I was feeling pretty good about that.  I mean, it wasn't even officially on sale yet and already I was ranked below a million.  Uh-huh, uh-huh, uh-huh. 

And then my editor emailed me back yet again and said that as far as the publishers could tell only one copy of that version of the book had been sold. (Thanks, Jenni–you've got a one-of-a-kind edition.)  So, as my daughter-in-law said, thus selling one book=#717,876 rank.  Does this mean if I sell two I get put right up to #1?   Um, probably not.  Apparently the Amazon algorithm is mysterious and unknown, just like the Google's.

Thus, note to self: do NOT fuss and obsess over the Amazon sales ranking when the book comes out.  Because it doesn't mean anything.  Does it?

Do you have experience with Amazon?  I'd love to hear it.  Barring that, what do you obsess over?  That's an even better topic.  Please share in the comments.

**There's only a couple more days of early-bird pricing for my Get Your Novel Written Now class.  Check out more info here.

 

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Emma Jean Cover Image is Here!

EmmaJeanCoverFinalHere it is!  The cover image for the novel, due out on February 12th.  I'm really happy with this cover because I think the woman in the image has the verve and energy of Emma Jean herself.

A bit of background on the process of selecting the cover.  My wonderful editor sent me three trial versions and asked me what I thought.  One of them looked like a car ad to me, with the model featuring a come-hither expression that looked to me like she was trying to be sexy.  She was draped over a bed with a laptop in front of her.  Good effort, but no.

The second one showed a close-up of a blonde woman with glasses reading a book.  I was tempted by this version, mostly because of the fact she was reading, but I didn't think the model looked much like Emma Jean.  She seemed a bit dowdy to me.  As my editor said, "I think Emma Jean is more put together than that."

The third version was similar to what you see on the right, but it showed only the model with slightly different typestyle.  I asked if we could add something literary-esque and my editor suggested the books.  The first version had the stack of books a bit taller and looked like they were about ready to topple over on top of her.  But then this version was presented to me–and I loved it.  They even used my favorite color, purple!  (In the novel, Emma Jean has a thing for purple pens.)

I feel blessed to have been so involved in the cover image.  I have no idea if this is normal or not but it's great!

So I'm counting down the days until release date, mastering Facebook, lining up guest posts and reviews and feeling a bit nervous about it all to be honest.  (By the way, if you're interested in a guest post or review or know anybody who might be, drop me a line.)

Any thoughts on the process?  Any questions?  Leave me a comment.

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Why Write a Book Proposal?


Paper_papers_letter_237662_l I attended a party over the weekend, where I was introduced to a couple of other writers (we already have plans to do Happy Hour together, we had so much fun).  But one of them asked me, "You mean people still have dreams of getting their books published?  Are any books even being published these days?"

Yes, ma'am, they are.

When I looked up statistics on how many books are being published a year, I came up with this statistic: in 2009, 1,02,803 books were published, according to Bowker, an industry analyst.

Um, in my world, that's still a lot of books.

And if one of those books is a work of non-fiction, the way you sell it is through a book proposal.  Odds are really good that even if you have your entire non-fiction book finished, an agent or editor will ask for a proposal.  I know this because it has happened to friends and clients of mine.

Which is why I'm all about writing a book proposal.  Because why not do what agents want in the first place?  And besides, the really cool thing about a book proposal is that its like a plan for your book.  So when you've finished the proposal, you know everything about the book: its structure, its content (down to chapter by chapter synopses), its flow.  And, guess what else?  You also know everything about where the book fits in the market and how you are going to position it.  So on the off-chance that the publishing world doesn't see the brilliance of your book idea and you decide to publish it yourself, you're all set.

Either way, its a win-win.  So what are you waiting for?

Oh, you don't know how to write a book proposal.  Well, the good news is that I do, and I'm once again offering my class on it.  Not only that, I'm offering crazy fast-action bonuses if you act now: a whopping $170 off the price and a one-hour coaching session to the first five who sign up. 

But.  (You knew there was a but.)

These enticements expire soon.  The crazy $170 off the price of the class expires at midnight, August 17th.  That's this Wednesday.  And your chance to nab a coaching session ends at midnight on August 24th. 

The other cool thing is that the class begins at the end of September.  Because I know we're all still in summer mode and don't really want to think about learning and writing and doing–that is September back-to-school energy, for sure.  But if you buy now, you get all the bonuses and the great price break.

So, check it out here.  You know you want to.  Oh, and by the way, if you have any questions about book proposals, ask them in the comments and I'll answer.

 

Photo by mordoc.

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7 Ways to Use Writing Prompts With Your Current Project

Writing prompts…love 'em or hate 'em.

Letter_paper_feather_234859_l

Some people swear by them, while others shudder at the thought of using a writing prompt in their work. Because, too often, using random writing prompts can lead you astray.  And let's face it, most prompts are a bit on the random side, aren't they?  Those books of prompts are great, but they have about as much as common with your novel in progress as flying to the moon does to a wedding dress.

Say you're stuck on your writing project, so you open one of your books of writing prompts, choose one and begin writing.  All well and good.  Except that you're just writing, not really writing about anything of much interest or use to you.

Now, I'm a great one for writing something, anything, on a regular basis.  And I often exhort people to do just that–particularly when they are stuck.  But writing mindlessly for any great length of time can be as frustrating as not writing.   Writing aimlessly is bad for your creative morale, because your heart and soul won't be in it.

The trick is to find a way to make your writing prompts relevant to your current project, so that they are enhancing your writing, not taking away from it.  When used in this manner, writing prompts can be wonderfully helpful in a couple of ways:

  • To generate actual writing
  • To get a flow of ideas going
  • To get yourself unstuck

And, remember, the best way to use prompts is as freely and loosely as possible.  Take your prompt, write it at the top of a sheet of paper, and set a timer for 15 to 20 minutes.  Then write.  And write and write and write, without stopping, until the timer goes off.

If you want to use writing prompts with your current project, here are some suggestions:

1. Take the last line of the previous scene or chapter and use it as a prompt.  Or take the first line.  Using a sentence from your work is a great way to drive deeper into the writing.  Because you are writing freely and loosely, your inner critic is silenced and you may be surprised what you come up with.

2. Put a location from your book into a sentence and use it as a prompt.  You can do this for the city or area your book is set in, or do it on a smaller scale, using a building such as your character's workplace or his home to write about.  This technique can help to uncover details you'll later use in description, or even ideas your character might have about her surroundings.

3. Put your character in a sentence.  Of course, this is sort of the whole point of writing a novel, but do this in a random way, having your character do either something unexpected or completely mundane and then write about it for 20 minutes.  You'll be amazed what you'll learn.

4. Use a line of dialogue from your project. 

5. Use keywords as prompts.   Quick, tell me three words that describe your writing project.  Now use those words as prompts–either one at a time or putting them into a sentence.

6. Use theme as a prompt.  Maybe you don't know what the theme of your book is–don't laugh, it takes many a draft to figure it out sometimes–or maybe you have a vague idea of it.  Make a sentence out of what your don't know or that vague idea and use it for a prompt.

7. Riff on the title.  Most works-in-progress have a title, even if its only a working title.  Use that for a prompt and see what comes up.

Those are some ways I've used prompts with my work-in-progress.  Any more suggestions?

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Overcomers Book Blog Stop

I am interested in overcoming adversity.  Also overcoming sloth, gluttony, laziness, and pride.  I think those are four of the seven deadly sins, no?  (Does anybody actually remember what the seven deadly sins are?)  I struggle with overcoming all of these bad traits on a daily basis.  Or at least weekly.  Overcomerbooksm

So when Nikki Leigh offered me the chance to be a blog stop on the Overcomers book tour, I said, hell yeah.  I can get on board the Overcomers wagon, despite the vaguely sexual ring to the title,  and write a post about it that will totally inspire people.  To begin with, let's define overcome.  Here are some of the words that I found on my Mac thesaurus (which is way better than the Microsoft thesaurus  by the way.  Waaaaaay better.  Just sayin'.):

beat, conquer, trounce, thrash, rout, vanquish, overwhelm, overpower, get the better of, triumph over, prevail over, win over/against, outdo, outclass, worst, crush; informal drub, slaughter, clobber, hammer, lick, best, crucify, demolish, wipe the floor with, make mincemeat of, blow out of the water, take to the cleaners, shellac, skunk.

Um, those are awesome words, verbs all, and I welcome you to use steal them and use them whenever you want.  I especially like the verbs trounce, thrash and vanquish.  I have learned to vanquish fears about getting my novel published.  Nice sentence, the verb really pumps it up.  But we are not here to discuss verbs today, we are here to discuss this new book.  Here's the deal: when you order the book you get over 85 free gifts. 

Just in case you don't have a clue what the book might be about after reading the post (and I can't say I blame you), I've compiled some interviews and excerpts for you.  We begin with some information from the book's introduction, written by publisher Lynne Kippel:      Lynneklipple-150x150



At one point in my life it seemed like
everywhere I looked, I saw tragedy. My brother,
both of my parents, and a dear friend were all
battling cancer at the same time. Other friends
were losing jobs and fearful about the prospects
of finding new work. The evening news was full
of financial scandals, plant closings,
kidnappings, and war.



As I sat in the sun on my front porch in March
2009, I wished I had a book to send to my
brother to read during his chemotherapy
treatments – something to remind him that he was
not alone and to encourage him to fight for his
life. I wanted a book that could give him hope,
inspiration, and encouragement on every page.



Due to a series of miracles, the book you are
now reading is my wish come true. In a very
short time a team of wonderful people came
together to create this book with just one
purpose: to encourage you, the reader, to
overcome whatever obstacles are lying in your
path to happiness.



As you read the stories in this book, you will
find real life tales of remarkable courage,
strength, and perseverance.  You will be
inspired, entertained, and uplifted. Some of the
stories will make you laugh. Some of them will
make you cry. All of them will make you proud of
the power of the human spirit. 



You will find this a book of diversity. There
are many authors, from many walks of life.
However, they all share a common bond. They
triumphed over tragedy and gleaned wisdom in
this process. While this is not a religious
book, there are stories full of faith, of many
kinds and flavors. It is funny how in your
darkest times, faith often becomes your
brightest light.



All of the contributors to this book want to
encourage you to hold tight to your belief that
a better day will come. It is their sincere
desire to pass along what they’ve learned
through their own trials, to make your journey
easier.



I hope that you wear this book out by
highlighting meaningful passages and bending
down the corners of the pages you want to read
over and over again. There is true wisdom in
these pages that can help you feel strong,
brave, and hopeful.



May you be blessed by this book and inspired to
overcome!



Lynne Klippel
St. Peters, Missouri
September, 2009

And just to whet your appetite, here is another excerpt from the book.  This one is from  Charlon Bobo.  I'll be honest here, I chose the excerpt because first of all I like Charlon's name and second I like her photo.  I think Charlon and I could totally be buds:

One Woman’s Empowering Journey From Fragmented
Child To Conscious Entrepreneur


Charlon BoboCharlonbobo1-107x150


As strange as it even seems to me at times, the
lessons of my childhood journey are applicable
to every aspect of my life, including the
everyday operations of my soulful business. As a
conscious entrepreneur, I pull from this
experience often to guide me. I’d like to share
with you the five key lessons of my pilgrimage.


1.   


Protective mechanisms are in place whether or
not I realize or acknowledge them.

I don’t always understand why a project fails to
materialize or a serious prospect seems to
change her mind. I do know there exists an
over-arching structure and order that conspires
on my behalf to bring about my highest personal
and professional growth. Whatever that wisdom, I
can trust it absolutely.


 


2.   


My ”story” doesn’t define who I am.


I am a vibrant business owner who grows every
day, and occasionally stumbles and falls on my
bum! Because I constantly create myself anew,
nothing from my past can effectively define or
imprison me. I consciously choose to “bring my
best game” to every day and know that’s enough.

 


3.   


Innate wisdom effortlessly guides me to the most
opportune time to take action.


When in doubt, I do nothing until ultimate
clarity presents itself. Although daily action
is a crucial component in accomplishing my
goals, I can also watch nature and use Her
guidance to positively influence my actions.
Nature provides a silent, fallow season – winter
– to turn inward to rest and restore. Using this
model, I reap the most benefit from my efforts.
Smart living requires me to balance action with
equal inaction.

 


4.   


My history doesn’t determine my level of
success.


I can accomplish any lofty goal I imagine
regardless of any perceived limitations. The
past doesn’t dictate my future. I gift myself
the pleasure and freedom to envision a life of
my design. Family-of-origin, childhood
circumstances, real or perceived impediments,
lack of skills, none of these compare to the
capacity of the human spirit to realize dreams.


 


5.   


I choose victimhood or empowerment every day
with my words, thoughts, and actions.



We do not control the actions of others and yet
we may be drawn into their drama. Like cast
members of a play, energetically we agreed to
these roles to teach AND learn. No matter my
external circumstances, my responses can only
come from one of two places: damage or
abundance. I choose abundance.


 


May you be profoundly blessed by reading my
story and take from it any value that forever
nourishes your soul.


From Overcomers, Inc.; True Stories
of Hope, Courage and Inspiration. To get your
own copy and receive dozens of bonus gifts go to




http://www.overcomersbook.com/booklaunch

Wise words, and there are more in the book itself.  So check it out.

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Creativity With a Purpose

I'm all for creativity–it is the centerpiece of my life.  As a writer, I've had to cultivate ways to be creative and stay creative on a regular basis.  This includes nurturing ideas, putting them on paper, and developing them into finished pieces, whether those finished pieces are paid work for clients or passion projects for myself. My creativity extends to other areas of my life, too, such as my love of knitting, of arranging (and rearranging) my home, and gardening.

Lately I've been thinking a lot about creativity.  Actually, I always think a lot about creativity, as I coach clients and students to be able to access it with ease on a regular basis.  But I've been pondering it more deeply as I move toward putting together a true online information business (Ebooks, teleclasses, and coaching, oh my!).

And what I've realized is that most of my work around creativity is very purpose driven.  I teach and promote creativity with a purpose–whether that purpose is a book you want to write, a skirt you want to sew, or a painting you want to paint.  Don't get me wrong–creativity for its own sake is wonderful.  But there are lots of great folks talking about and teaching that kind of creativity.  My niche is helping people who need to be creative for a reason blast blocks and get down to it.

I've got a lot of ideas and plans for this niche, so stay tuned.  Better yet, subscribe to my newsletter to make sure you stay up to date.

And for those of you whose creative bent tends toward business, I've got a great tip for you.  The fabulous Marney at Artella is presenting the beta version of her new teleclass, The Complete Idealist's Blissness Action Camp. and it starts on Monday.  Because its the beta version, the class is half-price–IF you register by Monday.  I'm signed up for it, and I can't wait–Marney's classes and products are always high value and lots of fun.  Either click one of the links in this post or click on the colorful button to the left to sign up.

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